“The Invention of Ethnicity in the United States” and “Race, Nation, and Culture in Recent Immigration Studies”

“The Invention of Ethnicity in the United States” and “Race, Nation, and Culture in Recent Immigration Studies”

“The Invention of Ethnicity in the United States” evaluates the constantly revised term of ethnicity and the relationship it has with immigrant identity and adaptation. The authors acknowledge three different definitions or concepts of ethnicity. The first one is referred to as basic group identity which involves the shared ancestry and culture of immigrant/ethnic groups. The next one is the concept of interest groups which define people by their socioeconomic position in society. The last one is the invention of ethnicity which highlights that cultural construction was accomplished over time. All of these, the authors argue, defined an overall definition of ethnicity. The active participation of immigrants identifying identities and a collective awareness that opposed the implications of assimilation. The authors make note that the accepting of ethnicity as a legitimate category of difference is a key component to understanding the invention and importance of ethnicity.

 

“Race, Nation, and Culture in Recent Immigration Studies” by George J. Sanchez explores the race, nation, and culture of immigration history. Sanchez argues that the role of immigration rested on two main events. The first being the 1965 Immigration Act which included Latin American and Asian immigrants. The second being the growth of scholarship in African America, Latinos, and Asian American immigrants. Sanchez argues that these two reasons allowed a further examination into how race played a role in immigration and society. The author brings up that immigration was based on European immigrants and the placement of foreignness. Foreignness includes the attitudes and perceptions of whites to non-whites. Sanchez concludes his argument by stating that Latin American and Asian immigrants did not simply show up after those two events but that they were present long before during other histories of colonialism and migration.

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